Curried Sorghum Cakes with Carrots & Arugula

With a simple, yet impressive, ingredient list, these whole-grain sorghum cakes couldn’t be any easier to make. And when you throw carrots, arugula, curry, and a hearty amount of garlic into the mix, they also don’t lack any oomph. These Curried Sorghum Cakes are definitely weeknight-dinner fare.

With a simple, yet impressive, ingredient list, these whole-grain sorghum cakes couldn’t be any easier to make. And when you throw carrots, arugula, curry, and a hearty amount of garlic into the mix, they also don’t lack any oomph. These Curried Sorghum Cakes are definitely weeknight-dinner fare. | Zestful Kitchen
For some reason figuring out what to make for dinner is continually a struggle for me. Even though I develop recipes as my full time job
and for this side hustle, I still find daily dinner inspiration nearly impossible. And don’t even talk to me about lunch.

With a simple, yet impressive, ingredient list, these whole-grain sorghum cakes couldn’t be any easier to make. And when you throw carrots, arugula, curry, and a hearty amount of garlic into the mix, they also don’t lack any oomph. These Curried Sorghum Cakes are definitely weeknight-dinner fare. | Zestful Kitchen
I’m not exaggerating when I say these curried sorghum cakes literally and figuratively saved me last week. I had them for almost every lunch and a handful of dinners. Some meals they were the main event, and for others they were a great addition to a green salad or roasted veggies.

With a simple, yet impressive, ingredient list, these whole-grain sorghum cakes couldn’t be any easier to make. And when you throw carrots, arugula, curry, and a hearty amount of garlic into the mix, they also don’t lack any oomph. These Curried Sorghum Cakes are definitely weeknight-dinner fare. | Zestful Kitchen
These are the kinds of recipes I love. Simple, healthy, packed with flavor, and can feed me throughout the week. But, as you know, those can be hard to come by! That’s why I’m making a conscious effort to offer more recipes designed for weeknight dinners and that also make great leftovers.


Anyway, back to them baby cakes. These tender cakes are made with white whole sorghum grain, which when cooked, has a delightful chewy texture and nutty flavor. It’s great for pilafs or salads, and when pulsed in a food processor, it takes on a sticky texture, perfect for forming into patties or “meatballs.” And with a good amount of iron and protein, sorghum makes these cakes a wonderful vegetarian (and gluten free) option.

With a simple, yet impressive, ingredient list, these whole-grain sorghum cakes couldn’t be any easier to make. And when you throw carrots, arugula, curry, and a hearty amount of garlic into the mix, they also don’t lack any oomph. These Curried Sorghum Cakes are definitely weeknight-dinner fare. | Zestful Kitchen
Cooking whole sorghum grain takes some patience, but it’s mostly hands off, so it’s easy and well worth the wait. I like to make a batch at the beginning of the week and throw it over salads, toss it into soups right before serving, or enjoy it for breakfast as a hot cereal with almond milk, fruit, and nuts.

With a simple, yet impressive, ingredient list, these whole-grain sorghum cakes couldn’t be any easier to make. And when you throw carrots, arugula, curry, and a hearty amount of garlic into the mix, they also don’t lack any oomph. These Curried Sorghum Cakes are definitely weeknight-dinner fare. | Zestful Kitchen

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Curried Sorghum Cakes with Carrots & Arugula
 
Prep time
Cook time
Takes
 
Author:
Makes: 12 cakes (4–6 servings)
Ingredients
  • ¾ cup white whole sorghum grain (such as NuLife Market)
  • 2¼ cups water
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil + 1 teaspoon, divided (+ more for cooking)
  • 1½ teaspoons kosher salt, divided
  • ½ cup minced shallot (about 1 shallot)
  • 4 ounces arugula, roughly chopped
  • 2 carrots, peeled, and shredded (8 ounces)
  • 1½ teaspoons minced fresh garlic
  • 2 teaspoons curry powder
  • Cracked black pepper
  • ¼ cup plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 large egg, lightly beaten
  • 2 tablespoons minced fresh cilantro
  • Greek yogurt lightly sweetened with honey
  1. Bring water, sorghum, 1 teaspoon oil, and ½ teaspoon salt to a boil in a medium saucepan over high heat. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer 80-85 minutes until grains are tender and water has been absorbed. Remove from heat, fluff with a fork, and let cool completely.
  2. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper.
  3. Transfer cooked sorghum to a food processor and pulse until the grains are chopped and start to stick together, about 20 one-second pulses; transfer to a large bowl.
  4. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a skillet over medium until shimmering. Add shallot and cook until softened, about 2 minutes. Stir in arugula and carrots and cook until arugula is wilted, about 2 minutes. Stir in garlic, curry powder, and 1 teaspoon salt, cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds; season with pepper. Add arugula mixture to bowl with sorghum and toss to combine; wipe out empty skillet.
  5. Add ¼ cup yogurt, egg, and cilantro to sorghum-arugula mixture and stir to combine. Divide mixture into 8 portions (¼ cup each) and pack into firm ½-inch-thick cakes. Transfer cakes to prepared sheet and chill until firm, about 30 minutes or up to overnight.
  6. To bake the sorghum cakes:
  7. Heat oven to 350°F. Coat a baking sheet with nonstick spray then transfer chilled cakes to sheet. Coat tops of cakes with nonstick spray and bake 15 minutes. Flip cakes and bake 10–15 minutes more until edges are crisp and cakes are cooked through.
  8. To fry the sorghum cakes:
  9. Heat oven to 200°F and set wire rack inside baking sheet.
  10. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in skillet over medium until shimmering. Gently lay 4–6 cakes in skillet and cook until golden brown and crisp on both sides, about 5 minutes per side. Transfer cooked cakes to prepared sheet and keep warm in the oven. Repeat with remaining cakes and additional oil.
  11. Serve cakes with a dollop of lightly sweetened greek yogurt, cilantro, and scallion greens.
Notes
Additional oil listed in ingredient does not have a specified amount due to which cooking method you choose to use. If you choose to cook on the stove top in a skillet, you will need 2–3 more tablespoons oil.

To quicken cooking time, cook sorghum up to 3 days in advance.

Store cakes in an airtight container, refrigerated, for up to 5 days.

Cooking and prep time do not include chilling or cooking of sorghum due to being hands-off time.

With a simple, yet impressive, ingredient list, these whole-grain sorghum cakes couldn’t be any easier to make. And when you throw carrots, arugula, curry, and a hearty amount of garlic into the mix, they also don’t lack any oomph. These Curried Sorghum Cakes are definitely weeknight-dinner fare. | Zestful Kitchen

 

With a simple, yet impressive, ingredient list, these whole-grain sorghum cakes couldn’t be any easier to make. And when you throw carrots, arugula, curry, and a hearty amount of garlic into the mix, they also don’t lack any oomph. These Curried Sorghum Cakes are definitely weeknight-dinner fare. | Zestful Kitchen

This post was created in partnership with Nu Life Market. As always, all thoughts and opinions are my own, thanks for supporting companies who make Zestful Kitchen possible!

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12 comments

    1. Rebecca, I totally agree, I’ve heard the same thing from a couple of readers. I hope that changes in the next few years. For this recipe, I have found that farro works really well in place of the sorghum grain. I use 2 cups cooked farro in place of the cooked sorghum!

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