The Mezcal Old Fashioned, also called the Oaxaca Old Fashioned is a smoky agave version of the classic Old Fashioned Cocktail. Made with oaky reposado tequila and smoky mezcal, this cocktail is definitely a slow sipper, but in all the best ways. 

The History

The Mezcal Old Fashioned, aka the Oaxaca Old Fashioned, originated in NYC (where all great things do) in 2007 by Phil Ward, a bartender and tequila specialist at Death & Co. in the East Village. Ward later added his signature cocktail, among a variety of other agave cocktails, to the menu at his own bar, Mayahuel (no longer open).

The Mezcal Old Fashioned is largely credited with igniting the newfound popularity of mezcal in the United States. And it makes sense. Ward took a familiar cocktail—whiskey old fashioned—and gave it a makeover. The key to encouraging people to try something new is to package it up as something they already recognize. 

Even though this cocktail is made with completely different ingredients, it’s recognizable and still features the expected oaky flavor from reposado tequila instead of whiskey. The original cocktail featured just half an ounce of mezcal to two ounces of tequila, a soft introduction to the smoky agave spirit. 

My version of the Oaxaca Old Fashioned features a whole ounce of mezcal to one and a half ounces tequila. I like the smokiness, but if you prefer cocktails to be light on the mezcal, start with a half an ounce. 

What’s in a Mezcal Old Fashioned

  • Reposado Tequila 
  • Mezcal
  • Agave Syrup
  • Angostura bitters 
  • Orange peel
  • Large ice cube (for serving)
  • Rocks glass 

Ingredient Tip

rocks glass filled with a clear liquid and large chunk of ice set on a white coaster. Someone flaming an orange peel over top

How to Make a Mezcal Old Fashioned

  1. Combine liquors and a couple dashes of bitters in a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Stir until well chilled (do not shake).
  2. Strain cocktail into a rocks glass with one large ice cube (or three standard ice cubes). 
  3. Light a match and flame the orange peel over the glass (this warms the oils in the peel and releases the flavor into the drink). Drop the charred orange peel in the cocktail and serve. 

Make sure to tag me @ZESTFULKITCHEN ON INSTAGRAM or comment below if you make this Mezcal Old Fashioned!

Mezcal Old Fashioned (Oaxaca Old Fashioned)

Print Recipe
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Prep Time 5 mins
Total Time 5 mins
Yield 1 cocktail
Category Drinks
Cuisine Mexican
Author Lauren Grant

Description

A smoky tequila cocktail based off the classic Old Fashioned. Made with flavorful reposado tequila, smoky mezcal and a dash of bitters. Served over a chunk of ice and finished with a charred orange peel.

Ingredients

  • 1 ½ ounces Reposado tequila
  • 1 ounce mezcal
  • 1 teaspoon agave syrup
  • 2 dashes angostura bitter or mole bitters
  • 1 orange peel

Instructions

  • Combine tequila, mezcal, agave, and bitters in a cocktail shaker filled with ice. Stir until thoroughly chilled. Strain into a rocks glass with one large ice cube or three standard ice cubes.
  • Flame orange peel with a lit match by running it along the orange side and edges. Drop orange peel in glass and serve.

Notes

If the smokiness of mezcal tends to be a bit strong for you, start with ½ ounce and add more as desired.

Nutrition

Serving: 1cocktailCalories: 157kcalCarbohydrates: 5gSodium: 1mgSugar: 4.5g
Keywords mezcal cocktail, Mezcal Old Fashioned, Oaxaca Old Fashioned
Did you make this recipe?Leave a comment below and tag @ZestfulKitchen on Instagram and hashtag it #zestfulkitchen!
rocks glass filled with a clear liquid, orange peel and large chunk of ice set on a white coaster.

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About The Author

Lauren Grant is a professional culinary food scientist, food writer, recipe developer, and food photographer. Lauren is a previous magazine editor and test kitchen developer and has had work published in major national publications including Diabetic Living Magazine, Midwest Living Magazine, Cuisine at Home Magazine, EatingWell.com, AmericasTestKitchen.com, and more.

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