This creamy smoked trout dip is bold yet fresh, featuring chives, dill and lemon. To keep things light and satisfying, this recipe uses a combination of Greek yogurt and crème fraîche instead of cream cheese, sour cream or mayonnaise.  

creamy white dip in a green glass bowl with a pair of hands spreading some dip on a cracker

To make this trout dip extra creamy, I call for straining the yogurt which removes excess liquid—this essentially makes labneh, a thick Mediterranean dip. The process is simple and is completely hands-off, but it does mean you need to plan a bit!

Watch how easy it is to make! I whipped this dip up in minutes with Hello Iowa from Channel 13 news.

How long does smoked trout dip last?

Trout dip will last up to three days stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator. If you’re planning to make this ahead of time to serve guests, I recommend making it no more than 2 days in advance.

smoked trout, yogurt, creme fraiche, chives, lemon and dill arranges on a cutting board on a table with a napkin

How to make smoked trout dip

  1. Strain the Greek yogurt by placing it in a double layer of cheesecloth (or coffee filters) set in a strainer over a bowl. Let the yogurt strain, in the refrigerator, for at least an hour until thickened. 
  2. Combine the strained yogurt, crème fraîche, herbs, lemon juice and zest; season with salt and pepper.
  3. Remove the skin and bones from the smoked trout and break into large chunks. Add the trout to the dip and mix, using a fork (this helps to break up the fish), until the trout is broken into small pieces. 
  4. Give the dip a taste and season with additional salt, pepper and lemon juice as needed. 
  5. If making ahead, cover and refrigerate until ready to serve.
creamy white dip in a green glass bowl with a wood knife set on the bowls edge

What kind of smoked trout to use

I recommend using refrigerated smoked trout fillets. You can find them—in airtight packaging—in the refrigerated section of your grocery store near the meat/seafood counters or the deli meat and cheese area. 

Most refrigerated smoked trout comes in 8-ounces package. Some of my favorite brands include, Ducktrap, Trader Joe’s, and Northern Waters Smokehaus which offers THE BEST mail-order smoked fish.

You can use canned smoked trout if that’s all that’s available, but the flavor and texture won’t be the same. 

Use any leftover trout in this Smoked Trout Salad featuring a creamy horseradish dressing. If you have leftover crème fraîche from this recipe, you that in the dressing instead of yogurt.

How to serve smoked trout dip

I prefer to serve this dip cold. Not only is it easier (you can make it ahead and chill it until ready to serve), but I find smoked fish dips are more enjoyable eaten cold or at room temperature.

To serve this dip warm, transfer it to a shallow ovenproof dish and top with buttery breadcrumbs; bake at 375ºF (190ºC) until topping is golden brown and dip is warmed through, about 20 minutes. 

Variations on this trout dip: 

  • Add prepared horseradish
  • Add chopped capers
  • Use cream cheese instead of Greek yogurt 
  • Use sour cream instead of crème fraîche
creamy white dip in a green glass bowl with a wood knife set on the bowls edge set on a wood table

Tag me @ZESTFULKITCHEN ON INSTAGRAM or tag #zestfulkitchen on social media if you make a recipe!

And if you make this smoked trout dip recipe, leave a comment and rating below!To pin this recipe and save it for later, you can click the button on any of the photos, or the red button on the bar below the recipe. Happy cooking!

Print
clock clock iconcutlery cutlery iconflag flag iconfolder folder iconinstagram instagram iconpinterest pinterest iconfacebook facebook iconprint print iconsquares squares iconheart heart iconheart solid heart solid icon
creamy white dip in a green glass bowl with a wood knife set on the bowls edge

Smoked Trout Dip with Crème Fraîche & Herbs

  • Author: Lauren Grant
  • Prep Time: 10 minutes + 1 hour straining time
  • Cook Time: 0 minutes
  • Total Time: 10 minutes + 1 hour straining time
  • Yield: 1 ⅔ cups 1x
  • Category: Appetizer
  • Method: no-cook
  • Cuisine: American/European

Description

Bold yet fresh in flavor, this smoked trout dip is made with strained yogurt (to make it ultra-creamy), crème fraîche, lemon, chives and dill.


Ingredients

Scale
  • ¾ cup wholemilk greek yogurt *
  • ¼ cup crème fraîche
  • 1 lemon, juiced and zested
  • 3 tablespoons chopped chives, plus more for serving
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill, plus more for serving
  • Kosher salt and cracked black pepper
  • 8 ounces smoked trout, skin and bones removed
  • Olive oil for serving 

Instructions

Place Greek yogurt in a double layer of cheesecloth (or a coffee filter) set in a fine mesh strainer set over a bowl; transfer to refrigerator and let strain at least 1 hour, or up to overnight.

Mix together strained yogurt, crème fraîche, 1 tablespoon lemon juice, 1 teaspoon lemon zest, chives, dill and a ¼ teaspoon each salt and pepper in a medium bowl. Add trout and, using a fork, mix to combine until trout flakes into small pieces. Taste and adjust seasoning as needed with salt, pepper and lemon juice.

To serve, drizzle dip with olive oil and top with more chives, dill, and pepper.



Notes

Stored in an airtight container in the refrigerator, this dip can be made up to 3 days ahead of time, though it’s best enjoyed within 2 days.

Greek yogurt: since we’re basically making labneh with the yogurt, you can swap the strained yogurt for ½ cup labneh. 


Nutrition

  • Serving Size: ⅛ of the recipe (3 Tbsp.)
  • Calories: 107
  • Sugar: 3g
  • Sodium: 101mg
  • Fat: 6.5g
  • Saturated Fat: 3g
  • Carbohydrates: 3g
  • Fiber: 0g
  • Protein: 9g
  • Cholesterol: 23mg

Keywords: smoked trout dip recipe, smoked trout dip, smoked trout dip with creme fraiche, trout dip

Recipe Card powered byTasty Recipes

Share it with the world

Pin

About The Author

Lauren Grant is a professional culinary food scientist, food writer, recipe developer, and food photographer. Lauren is a previous magazine editor and test kitchen developer and has had work published in major national publications including Diabetic Living Magazine, Midwest Living Magazine, Cuisine at Home Magazine, EatingWell.com, AmericasTestKitchen.com, and more.

Learn More

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published.

Recipe rating